Sunday, January 8, 2017

Handout CL: Classroom Policies and Expectations

Your primary responsibility in this context is to be a good student.  Good students attend all classes and arrive on time; participate regularly, thoughtfully, and respectfully; consistently strive to produce high quality work and meet all deadlines; consult with the professor during office hours when necessary; seek out assistance when required; and, most generally, openly, deliberately, and with enthusiasm embrace this and other formal opportunities for intellectual, scholarly growth. (See also Time Magazine's brief take on "deep learners.")

My class policies and expectations, consonant with this understanding of what it means to be or strive to be a good student, are as follows:

Attendance
Missing class (or arriving late/leaving early) is not an excuse for missing a deadline or an assignment. Attendance is absolutely required to benefit from or contribute to the seminar. Even so, I will not take or grade attendance (except on those occasions when it is required for institutional record-keeping). Physically attending class is such an obvious and nominal requirement of any adult learner in a non-compulsory, post-secondary educational setting that it would be errantly paternalistic and ineffective (I assume, as the cliché suggests, external reward often undermines internal motivation) to award some kind of “credit” for mere attendance. In short: please don't take my seminars if you plan not to attend or to arrive late.

Participation
Likewise, aside from the basic respect due all persons, I will not award any kind of special credit to those who, in fulfilling an equally basic and obvious duty as a member of a community of learners/scholars, regularly and effectively participate in classroom discussions and other activities. Even so, since each of my seminars is discussion-intensive, I expect all students to participate fully. Mandatory classroom participation schemes, however, like attendance policies, often are little more than paternalistic incentives designed to trick or force (adult) students into acting like adults. In short: please don't take my seminars if you plan not to contribute.

Grading
Despite the heavy financial and opportunity costs which attend post-secondary schooling, no one, independently of his or her scholarly performance, has purchased or contracted for a right to a good or passing grade. Rather, good grades must be earned. In an effort to resist the triadic wave of grade inflation, social promotion, and consumerism currently plaguing our educational institutions, I strictly adhere to a traditional understanding of the grades A-F (outstanding-abysmal) as articulated by the Foundation for Critical Thinking:

http://www.criticalthinking.org/pages/critical-thinking-class-grading-policies/442

Furthermore, I fallibly grade students on their individual performance, not on some kind of collectivist “curve.” Our role as teachers is to grade student work, not the students themselves. That is, I do not -- and do not think it fair or right for anyone to -- grade student effort, potential, intelligence, character, goals, needs, or any other feature of a student’s life aside from his or her scholarly products. In short: please don't expect to receive a grade better than the one you earn.

Unexcused Absences/Make-ups/Extra Credit/Incompletes and other Nonsensical terms
Aside from officially sanctioned reasons for absence or lateness as outlined in the official MCLA Student Handbook, I will – on principle and in fairness to those who do their work in a timely fashion – strictly enforce all course deadlines. Therefore, I will not offer (undocumented) "incompletes," “makeup exams," “partial credit” for late work, or “extra credit” for those hoping to improve existing grades. In short: please don't take my seminars unless you plan to do all of your work on time.

Civility/behavior/electronic distractions
I believe that nothing is more corrosive to our educational success than incivility (a broad category which includes all manner of inappropriate or disruptive behavior, including incessant joking, chatting, arriving late/leaving early, expressing anger, engaging in personal attacks (we discuss the merits of ideas here, not persons) and using a cellphone or any other electronic gadget, including laptops). While honest disagreement and debate (along with occasional laughter and surprise) are natural and welcome consequences of our inquiries, there is never a call for disruptive, disrespectful, abusive, or intimidating words or actions of any sort in our dealings with each other in a classroom setting (virtual or otherwise). For online coursework, always follow the basic rules of "netiquette."  In short: please don't take my seminars if you cannot remain considerate of others.

Special Accommodations
I will happily honor any officially documented requirements for special accommodations as outlined in the MCLA Student Handbook.  Please consult MCLA's "Students with Disabilities" policy statement.

Handout QAHO: Q&As (honors, online, and 300-level sections)

What is a Q&A?
A Q&A is a relatively brief writing assignment that asks each student to answer one question (typically posed by the professor) and to raise two further questions about a particular subject/text (I could more accurately call these assignments "A&Qs," but that acronym sounds ugly to me). Typically, Q&As are posted by Friday evening in on my main weblog on the Q&A page corresponding to the course and due the following Friday in hard copy at the close of class (the final exam period with serve as our final due date).

Why write a Q&A?
(1) Q&As encourage critical, careful, deliberate reading of texts — readings which begin with thorough exposition and end with critical interpretation; (2) Q&As create a more permanent (written) record of the reader's reflections on a text and its author's (apparent) intentions; and (3) Q&As can promote and assist classroom/online discussion of texts.

How does one successfully complete a Q&A? 
A complete Q&A consists of these four parts (their approximate value indicated in percentages):

1. (70%) Each student produces a 500-750-word (two-to-three full double-spaced pages) answer to the question I pose.  Answers should be typed and free of grammatical/stylistic errors (see the "Writing Checklist"). All answers must take the form of well researched, argumentative (or "critical" or "persuasive") essays.  I've outlined the format for composing these essays in Handouts CR1, CR2, and CR3.  Two related components, therefore, must be present:

2. (15%) A complete CRITO outline (on a separate page from the main essay; see the example in red included on Handout CR3); and

3. (10%) Full bibliographic reference to and use of, minimally, one outside resource (a resource other than the target reading I assign).  Properly cite all quoted or paraphrased material.  Any established style is acceptable (MLA, APA, etc.)  My only concern is that the method you choose is consistent, complete, and accurate.

And finally,

4. (5%) each student then composes two well-formed and thoughtful questions related to the topic at hand, avoiding rhetorical ("who's to say what is really true?") or simple ("how do you pronounce Kant?") questions in favor of substantive issues of genuine concern to the student. It is not necessary to answer the questions you raise.  Simply number the questions "1" and "2" and position them at the bottom of your essay.

How are Q&As graded?
Each student will receive, in traditional, face-to-face courses, a grade of "check minus minus," “check minus,” “check,” or “check plus,” corresponding to the letter grades D, C, B, and A (I will simply assign letter grades for all online courses).  Though grading is a fallible affair, in general, most Q&As will receive a “check” or "check minus" (B or C) unless obviously deficient or exemplary in some respect.  In full semester (15 week) courses, students are allowed one unexcused missed Q&A. (Unexcused) late work receives no credit at all.  For an explanation of any abbreviations included in my commentary, consult my "Editorial Suggestions Key."

Note well: Q&As are the only graded component of the course, so missing an assignment or two beyond the one allowable typically leads to failure.  I collect hard copies of papers on the due date at the close of class.  I do not accept papers in electronic form.

Handout QA: Q&As (nonhonors/100-200-level sections)

What is a Q&A?
A Q&A is a brief writing assignment that asks each student to answer one question (typically posed by the professor) and to raise two further questions about a particular subject (I could more accurately call these assignments "A&Qs," but that acronym sounds ugly to me).  Typically, Q&As are posted by Friday evening in on my main weblog on the Q&A page corresponding to the course and due the following Friday in hard copy at the close of class (the final exam period with serve as our final due date).

Why write a Q&A?
(1) Q&As encourage critical, careful, deliberate reading of texts — readings which begin with thorough exposition and end with critical interpretation; (2) Q&As create a more permanent (written) record of the reader's reflections on a text and its author's (apparent) intentions; and (3) Q&As can promote and assist classroom discussion of texts.

How does one successfully complete a Q&A?
A complete Q&A consists of these two parts:

1. Each student produces a 250-500-word (one-to-two full double-spaced pages) answer to the question I pose.  Answers should be typed and relatively free of grammatical/stylistic errors.  All answers must take the form of argumentative (or "critical" or "persuasive") essays.  I've outlined the format for composing these essays in Handouts ST, CR1, CR2, and CR3.  You are not required to include a "CRITO outline" (see handout CR3) with your final essay.  Properly cite all quoted or paraphrased material.  Any established style is acceptable (MLA, APA, etc.)  My only concern is that the method you choose is consistent, complete, and accurate.

2. Each student then composes two well-formed and thoughtful questions related to the topic at hand, avoiding rhetorical ("who's to say what is really true?") or simple (when was Kant born?) questions in favor of substantive issues of genuine concern to the student.  It is not necessary to answer the questions you raise.  Simply number the questions "1" and "2" and position them at the bottom of your essay.

How are Q&As graded?
Each student will receive a grade of "check minus minus," “check minus,” “check,” or “check plus,” corresponding to the letter grades D, C, B, and A.  Although grading is a fallible affair, in general most Q&As will receive a “check” or "check minus" unless obviously deficient or exemplary in some respect. In full semester (15 week) courses, students are allowed one unexcused missed Q&A. (Unexcused) late work receives no credit at all.  For an explanation of any abbreviations included in my marginal commentary on your work, consult my "Editorial Suggestions Key."

Note well: Q&As are the only graded component of the course, so missing an assignment or two beyond the one allowable typically leads to failure.  I collect hard copies of papers on the due date at the close of class.  I do not accept papers in electronic form.

Handout CR1: Brief Essay Desribing the CRITO Method

"Critical Thinking and the Argumentative Essay"
DKJ, 2001
National Critical Thinking Conference
Atlanta, GA

It has always been my nature never to accept advice from any of my friends unless reflection shows that it is the best course that reason offers.  ---- Socrates, in Crito

In this brief essay I introduce a writing technique (CRITO) easily adaptable to any discipline whose curriculum includes formal writing in which the student makes and supports substantive claims (the so-called "argumentative" or "evaluative" essay). Following the philosopher Harvey Siegel, I begin with the idea that a critical thinker is one who is appropriately moved by reasons. This characterization of critical thinking combines a reason assessment component (the principled assessment of reasons and their ability to warrant beliefs, claims, and actions; that is, the domain of arguments) and a critical attitude component (the disposition to engage in principled reason assessment). It follows that the fully critical thinker is both able and disposed to engage in principled reason assessment:

"Such a person habitually seeks evidence and reasons, and is predisposed so to seek -- and to base belief and action on the results of such seeking. She applies the skills and abilities of reason assessment in all appropriate contexts, including those contexts in which her own beliefs and actions are challenged (emphasis mine)." (H. Siegel, Educating Reason, p. 32)

As the final line of this passage suggests, the critical temper is often least spontaneous as we confront our most basic prejudices or deeply held convictions. In these situations, to paraphrase Siegel, we may possess the ability, but not the disposition, to assess critically certain of our beliefs or claims.

CRITO (formed acronymically from the logical terms Conclusion, Reasons, Inference, Truth, and Objections) addresses both the principled reason assessment and critical attitude components of critical thinking. The technique requires students to assess critically (carefully, impartially, consistently) the validity (or strength) of their own inferences, the truth of reasons supplied in defense of conclusions, and, finally, the soundness (or cogency) of those inferences. I claim no originality for the individual elements of CRITO, which simply mirror (in C, R, I, and T) the essential components of any cogent (inductive) or sound (deductive) inference and, not surprisingly, provide an effective outline for (or first draft of) an argumentative or evaluative essay. Although I have chosen to describe its components in the language of formal logic, CRITO requires only a general understanding of the nature of rational argumentation.

C: First, each student must identify clearly the central claim or conclusion (C) he or she hopes to defend. The central claim of an argumentative essay ought to be straightforward, singular, substantive (non-tautological and the object of possible or actual debate), ostensibly defensible, and of genuine interest to the student. (C) is often tentative, in the sense that the student is aware that it is potentially criticizable and open to revision. This first step in producing an argumentative essay – deciding exactly what to write about -- is perhaps the most important. I have devised, therefore, a separate technique (“STEP-I,” an acronym formed from five stages of “C” production – selecting a topic of interest and ensuring its truthfulness, explicitness, particularity, and importance) to help students think critically about choosing and refining the central claims of their essays.

R: Second, (C) requires for its defense a set of premises or reasons (R). Logic demands only that each argument has at least one premise, though the number ought to be sufficient to convince the reader of the truth (accuracy, reasonableness, and so on) of (C).

I: Third, the student must assess the inference (I), or logical connection between (R) and (C), to ensure that the reasons are sufficient to produce (C), either with some degree of probability (inductively) or with certainty (deductively). In less formal terms, this step determines the validity (or, with induction, the strength) of the inference, since an argument can fail despite all of its parts being true (as one might try to defend a true conclusion with irrelevant premises). Failing the (I) test, the student must add to or qualify the existing reasons and conclusion to produce a new argument.

T: Fourth, the student must assess the truth (T) of the reasons, since even a valid or strong argument (that is, a valid or strong argument that passes the (I) test) may contain any number of false parts. The student must replace or refine false premises. Only the best (deductively sound or inductively cogent) arguments will pass both the (I) and the (T) tests.

O: Fifth, the student must construct the strongest imaginable objection(s) (O) to the argument, testing further its ability to withstand critical scrutiny. This is, perhaps, the most difficult stage of CRITO, for it sanctions a potentially unsettling fallibilism; that is, it asks the student to imagine that his or her considered judgments remain susceptible to revision. Finally, the student should respond to the objection(s), adjusting the original argument as necessary.

Since its original publication, CRITO has assisted secondary and post-secondary instructors' efforts to teach philosophy, music, sociology, mathematics, and English composition. While the method has naturally evolved to suit individual teaching styles and pedagogical concerns, several core skills remain invariant across all applications, including CRITO's basic attention to the adequacy of reasons and the process of reasoning itself, the notion of authorial fallibility, the refinement of students' own pre-critical views, and the development of the habit or disposition systematically to question such views.

I will close with three general comments on the method. First, despite its somewhat formulaic appearance, CRITO (together with its complement, STEP-I) merely provides well-placed and potentially rewarding prompts for student activity and reflection. Like other critical thinking techniques, CRITO does not guarantee, but only promotes and directs, critical thought and behavior. It is no routine or easy task, however, to accept even partially CRITO's challenge to engage in principled reason assessment or, especially, to construct and consider nontrivial objections to one's current beliefs.

Second, CRITO presents an opportunity to have these challenges to the students' considered judgments issue, not from the instructor, but from the students themselves, as they learn to apply general rules of good reasoning to their own beliefs and arguments. As an affective strategy, the impersonal, seemingly objective, nature of CRITO's demands may help to provide the emotional space in which students can accept and learn from nontrivial challenges to their most basic assumptions.

Finally, in addition to its obvious value for both "writing-to-learn" and "learning-to-write" programs, CRITO is compatible with most forms of collaborative learning. Small group work, especially pairs , in which students alternate between presenting their work and listening to and commenting critically on another student's work, can facilitate each successive stage of principled reason (and objection) assessment.

(A longer version of this essay, co-authored by Matt Silliman and published in Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Curriculum, 17, 4, is available in my office or the library.)

Handout CR2: CRITO-Based Argumentative/Persuasive Essays

Mechanics (form): Your essay — excluding footnotes, bibliography, and CRITO outline (see handout CR3) — should be approximately 1-2 (nonhonors sections) or 2-3 (honors and online sections) pages in length; it should have, as a maximum, one-inch margins all around; it should be double-spaced in 10-12 point, non-italicized font of your preferred type and be left justified only; it should include your name and date, single-spaced, in the upper left-hand corner; it should contain no grammatical or spelling errors and conform to the basic conventions of academic, or formal, writing (for example, no contractions (can't, don't, etc.), slang, or inappropriate gender-specific language (mankind vs. humankind, he vs. he or she, etc.); minimal use of the passive voice,* nominalizations,** and "mere opinion" (CRITO will be invaluable here);*** and proper — meaning consistent — use of footnotes and bibliography). See also the philosophy department's Style Checklist. Edit your work frequently and carefully: Poor form and style seriously distract from and often undermine the quality of the content.

Grading: (as outlined in your syllabus and/or in the handout on Q&A's).

However, when assigning letter grades, I attempt to adhere to a traditional understanding of the grades A-F (outstanding-abysmal) as articulated by the Foundation for Critical Thinking:

http://www.criticalthinking.org/pages/critical-thinking-class-grading-policies/442

Content: At times I will determine the specific focus of your essay (this is especially true for Q&A's); other times the topic will be one you choose (with my approval). Your task is to research, construct, and refine a sophisticated yet clear, philosophical yet interesting, argumentative essay. I expect that your thinking and research efforts will take you well beyond the texts I assign in class — these essays are your opportunity to shine as a researcher, writer, artist, and scholar.

-------------------------------

*Avoid the passive voice whenever possible.

For example:

Good: "Good writers avoid the passive voice."
Not so good: "The passive voice is avoided by good writers."

**Avoid nominalizations by expressing important actions as verbs, not nouns.

For example:

Good: "He decided to write clearly."
Not so good: "He made a decision in favor of clarity in his writing."

***Opinions require substantiation.

For example:

“Informed” opinion: "I think Clive Bell is right (or wrong) for reasons X, Y, and Z."
“Mere” opinion: "I think Clive Bell is right (or wrong)."

CR3: Creating a CRITO Outline

CRITO (formed acronymically from the terms Conclusion, Reasons, Inference, Truth, and Objections) addresses both the principled reason assessment and critical attitude components of critical thinking, by requiring students to assess critically (carefully, impartially, consistently, logically, accurately, and relatively autonomously) their beliefs or claims. The individual elements of CRITO mirror the essential components of any cogent or sound inference and provide an effective outline for an argumentative or evaluative essay.

Creating a CRITO Outline

C: State conclusion (or claim) (C). (C) ought to be explicit and clear, particular or singular, important and substantive (the object of possible or actual debate), truthful and accurate, and of genuine interest to the student.

R: State reasons (R), premises, or evidence, sufficient to convince the reader of the truth (accuracy, reasonableness, and so on) of (C).

I: Test the inference (I), or argument, to ensure that reasons are sufficient to produce (C).

T: Test the truth (T) of (R), since even a valid or strong argument (that is, a valid or strong argument that passes the (I) test) may contain any number of false parts. Only the best (deductively sound or inductively cogent) arguments pass both the (I) and the (T) tests.

O: Construct the strongest imaginable objection(s) (O) to the argument. Finally, respond to the objection(s), making any necessary revisions to the original argument.

Therefore, a complete CRITO outline should look something like this and fit easily on one page:

Student's Name
Date
Course

C: Central claim of essay (one sentence).
R: All reasons or evidence required to defend C (one sentence for each R).
O: Strongest imaginable objection(s) to C (one sentence for each O).
RO: Response to the objection (one sentence for each RO).

(Note: There will typically be 2-3 R's and at times more than one O.)

Relation of CRITO Outline to Final Essay/Q&A
A CRITO outline produces merely the rough content for an essay, the exact form of which ought to follow the guidelines for producing critical/persuasive essays (see handout CR2) and will be determined by the effort, talent, and imagination of its author. (Note: only the content of stages C, R, and O will be noticeable in both the outline and final essay. I and T are logical tests designed solely to strengthen the overall argument of the essay.)

Spring, 2017 Syllabi (scroll down to desired syllabus)

Art and Philosophy-Honors
Spring, 2017
MWF 10-11:50
Bowman 201

Professor:            Dr. David Kenneth Braden-Johnson                         
Department:       Philosophy, Interdisciplinary Studies, and Modern Languages
Office:                  Office #2, 100 Porter Street
Office Hours:      MWF 9-10
Phone:                  (413) 662-5448
Email:                   d.johnson@mcla.edu
Blog:                      http://www.critojazz.blogspot.com

Required Text:  Neill and Ridley, Arguing About Art

Focus of Class
This is an introductory yet rigorous seminar in the philosophy of art (often called “aesthetics”).  In the context of a philosophical (essentially theoretical, rather than a more narrowly historical, psychological, or sociological, etc.) approach to the products and processes of human artistic efforts, this course surveys and employs a variety of traditional and contemporary concepts for describing accurately our experience, understanding, and appreciation of all forms of art.

Our philosophical inquiries will set out from two central questions of aesthetics: “What is art/the aesthetic?” and “What is the source of art’s unique value to humans?”  We will then take up several related, domain-specific, or applied questions such as:

What are the significant connections between artists and their audiences, society, history, politics, and the so-called “art-world”?  What is the nature of artistic innovation and/or creativity?  How are emotions/feelings, knowledge, truth, taste, beauty, and interpretation related to the arts?

Online Activities
My blog listed above contains links to all supporting course handouts and assignments, including a noninteractive page that lists weekly writing assignments for this course (“Q&As: Art and Philosophy”).  Since I prefer to devote class-time to the exposition and analysis of student and textual positions, I typically reserve my own views for this online medium.

Class Policies and Expectations
Carefully review Handout CL and the honors Director’s short essay, designed for honors students but to my mind applicable to good students everywhere, “What Makes Honors Students Honorable?” in Thesis XII Online (http://thesisxii.blogspot.com)

Cancellations
I will attempt to email the entire class on Office 365 to warn of any unanticipated cancellations.

Laptop Policy
Like a concert hall or theater, our classroom is reserved for face-to-face interaction. Thus, barring special needs or circumstances, you may bring but not use your laptop during class. The same policy applies to cell phones, IPods, and all other distracting gadgets. Please print out in advance any electronic material required for class.

Q&As
Each week (with a couple of exceptions), students will complete short, highly-polished, critical (See Handouts CR1, CR2, and CR3) writing assignments (typically based on a specific reading from our text) called “Q&As” (see Handout QAHO).

My grading policy is, therefore, transparent and simple, based solely on the scores of your Q&As. (See Handouts QAHO and CL, “grading”).

 --------------

Art and Philosophy
Spring, 2017
MWF 11-11:50
Bowman 201

Professor:            Dr. David Kenneth Braden-Johnson                       
Department:       Philosophy, Interdisciplinary Studies, and Modern Languages
Office:                  Office #2, 100 Porter Street
Office Hours:      MWF 9-10
Phone:                  (413) 662-5448
Email:                   d.johnson@mcla.edu
Blog:                      http://www.critojazz.blogspot.com

Required Text:  Neill & Ridley, Arguing About Art

Focus of Class
This is an introductory yet rigorous seminar in the philosophy of art (often called “aesthetics”).  In the context of a philosophical (essentially theoretical, rather than a more narrowly historical, psychological, or sociological, etc.) approach to the products and processes of human artistic efforts, this course surveys and employs a variety of traditional and contemporary concepts for describing accurately our experience, understanding, and appreciation of all forms of art.

Our philosophical inquiries will set out from two central questions of aesthetics: “What is art/the aesthetic?” and “What is the source of art’s unique value to humans?”  We will then take up several related, domain-specific, or applied questions such as:

What are the significant connections between artists and their audiences, society, history, politics, and the so-called “art-world”?  What is the nature of artistic innovation and/or creativity?  How are emotions/feelings, knowledge, truth, taste, beauty, and interpretation related to the arts?

Online Activities
My blog listed above contains links to all supporting course handouts and assignments, including a non-interactive page that lists weekly writing/reading assignments for this course (“Q&As: Art and Philosophy”).  Since I prefer to devote class-time to the exposition and analysis of student and textual positions, I typically reserve my own views for this online medium.

Class Policies and Expectations
Carefully review Handout CL and the honors Director’s short essay, designed for honors students but to my mind applicable to good students everywhere, “What Makes Honors Students Honorable?” in Thesis XII Online (http://thesisxii.blogspot.com)

Cancellations
I will attempt to email the entire class on Office 365 to warn of any unanticipated cancellations.

Laptop Policy
Like a concert hall or theater, our classroom is reserved for face-to-face interaction. Thus, barring special needs or circumstances, you may bring but not use your laptop during class. The same policy applies to cell phones, IPods, and all other distracting gadgets. Please print out in advance any material required for class.

Q&As
Each week (with a couple of exceptions), students will complete short, highly-polished, critical (See Handouts CR1, CR2, and CR3) writing assignments (typically based on a specific reading from our text) called “Q&As” (see Handout QA).

My grading policy is, therefore, transparent and simple, based solely on the scores of your Q&As. (See Handouts QA and CL, “grading”).

------------


Philosophy of Literature
Spring, 2017
MWF 1-1:50
Bowman 218

Professor:            Dr. David Kenneth Braden-Johnson                         
Department:       Philosophy, Interdisciplinary Studies, and Modern Languages
Office:                  Office #2, 100 Porter
Office Hours:      MWF 9-10
Phone:                  (413) 662-5448
Email:                   d.johnson@mcla.edu
Blog:                      http://www.critojazz.blogspot.com

Required Texts: (all other readings online or in handout form or TBA)
1. John and Lopes, Eds., Philosophy of Literature (in bookstore) 
2. F. Dostoevsky, Crime and Punishment (arriving soon at bookstore)

Focus of Course
This course hybridizes two distinguishable yet overlapping approaches to the intersection of philosophy and literature: 1. The philosophy of literature and 2. Philosophy in literature.  The former approach (that of John and Lopes, eds.) considers ways in which philosophical analysis augments our appreciation of literature, while the latter approach focuses on the contributions of literature to philosophical understanding.  To this end, and partly in response to the resurgence in the US and Western Europe of simple-minded Russophobic and dangerous cold-warlike sentiment and behavior, we will take up a close reading/analysis of Dostoevsky’s Crime and Punishment, along with brief introductions to elements of Russian history, culture, and language.

The first approach typically raises these sorts of questions (see the John and Lopes volume):

How ought we to define literature and fiction?
Do fictional characters exist?
Can we make true or false claims about fictional characters and events?
What is the nature and source of our emotional responses to literature?
Must we accept any particular constraints on our interpretations of a work of literature?

And the second approach typically raises these sorts of questions:

Should a writer whose aims are essentially philosophical incorporate elements of literary form?
Should a writer whose aims are essentially literary make use of philosophical analysis or ideas?
Can (should) literature improve our philosophical understanding or knowledge?
Can (should) literature improve its readers morally?

Online Activities
My blog listed above contains links to all supporting course handouts and assignments, including a noninteractive page that lists weekly writing assignments for this course (“Q&As: Phil. of Literature”).  Since I prefer to devote class-time to the exposition and analysis of student and textual positions, I typically reserve my own views for this online medium. Please feel free to offer comments on my blog posts.

Class Policies and Expectations
Carefully review Handout CL and the honors Director’s short essay, designed for honors students but to my mind applicable to good students everywhere, “What Makes Honors Students Honorable?” in Thesis XII Online (http://thesisxii.blogspot.com)

Cancellations
I will attempt to email the entire class on Office 365 to warn of any unanticipated cancellations.

Laptop Policy
Like a concert hall or theater, our classroom is reserved for face-to-face interaction. Thus, barring special needs or circumstances, you may bring but not use your laptop during class. The same policy applies to cell phones, IPods, and all other distracting gadgets. Please print out in advance any electronic material required for class.

Q&As
Each week (with a couple of exceptions), students will complete short, highly-polished, critical (See Handouts CR1, CR2, and CR3) writing assignments (typically based on a specific reading from our text) called “Q&As” (see Handout QAHO).

My grading policy is, therefore, transparent and simple, based solely on the scores of your Q&As. (See Handouts QAHO and CL, “grading”).